Grade 7
Social Studies TEKS

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Directions

This document is arranged to give immediate access to the TEKS as written by the state of Texas. Each TEKS, including the introduction, will be followed by resources for your use. As you, the teacher, begin to plan for lessons that address the various seventh grade Social Studies TEKS:


        1. Scroll down the document, click on the appropriate TEKS
        2. Review and evaluate the sites and/or software that relate to the designated TEKS
        3. Plan appropriately.

Some of the WWW sites and instructional software can be used with various TEKS. Therefore, you will encounter the use of these WWW sites and software more than once.

 


Grade 7

Introduction TEKS 7.6 TEKS 7.12 TEKS 7.18
TEKS 7.1 TEKS 7.7 TEKS 7.13 TEKS 7.19
TEKS 7.2 TEKS 7.8 TEKS 7.14

TEKS 7.20

TEKS 7.3 TEKS 7.9 TEKS 7.15 TEKS 7.21
TEKS 7.4 TEKS 7.10 TEKS 7.16 TEKS 7.22
TEKS 7.5 TEKS 7.11 TEKS 7.17 TEKS 7.23

Introduction

(1) In Grade 7, students study the history of Texas from early times to the present. Content is
presented with more depth and breadth than in Grade 4. Students examine the full scope of Texas
history, including the cultures of Native Americans living in Texas prior to European exploration and the eras of mission-building, colonization, revolution, republic, and statehood. The focus in each era is on key individuals, events, and issues and their impact. Students identify regions of Texas and the distribution of population within and among the regions and explain the factors that caused Texas to change from an agrarian to an urban society. Students describe the structure and functions of municipal, county, and state governments, explain the influence of the U.S. Constitution on the Texas Constitution, and examine the rights and responsibilities of Texas citizens. Students use primary and secondary sources to examine the rich and diverse cultural background of Texas as they identify the different racial and ethnic groups that settled in Texas to build a republic and then a state. Students analyze the impact of scientific discoveries and technological innovations such as barbed wire and the oil and gas industries on the development of Texas. Students use primary and secondary sources to acquire information about Texas.

(2) To support the teaching of the essential knowledge and skills, the use of a variety of rich primary
and secondary source material such as biographies and autobiographies; novels; speeches, letters, and diaries; and poetry, songs, and artworks is encouraged. Selections may include a biography of Barbara Jordan or Lorenzo de Zavala and William B. Travis' letter "To the People of Texas and All Americans in the World." Motivating resources are also available from museums, historical sites, presidential libraries, and local and state preservation societies.

(3) The eight strands of the essential knowledge and skills for social studies are intended to be integrated for instructional purposes with the history and geography strands establishing a sense of time and a sense of place. Skills listed in the geography and social studies skills strands in subsection (b) of this section should be incorporated into the teaching of all essential knowledge and skills for social studies. A greater depth of understanding of complex content material can be attained when integrated social studies content from the various disciplines and critical-thinking skills are taught together.

(4) Throughout social studies in Kindergarten-Grade 12, students build a foundation in history;
geography; economics; government; citizenship; culture; science, technology, and society; and social studies skills. The content, as appropriate for the grade level or course, enables students to understand the importance of patriotism, function in a free enterprise society, and appreciate the basic democratic values of our state and nation as referenced in the Texas Education Code, §28.002(h)
.

 

tx2.gif (3365 bytes)   Mini Study of a State (Adapt for Texas)

Students will learn to do research while comparing their state with another state in the U.S. They will be graded on information, drawing and art work,spelling, punctuation, and neatness. They will be given a prepared list of questions and will be encouraged to use various resources to answer them. There will also be additional extensions for students to complete.

 

na.jpg (41304 bytes)  Native American Thematic Unit

Students use knowledge of the past to construct meaningful understanding of our diverse Texas culture and heritage to inform their civic judgments. This unit promotes cultural awareness, basic world geography, and the significance of historical events on the world today. It includes three-week lesson plans, integration of the five senses, the seven intelligence's, interactive bulletin boards, and unit rubrics.

 

cdrom.jpg (1300 bytes)  1998 Grolier Encyclopedia
1996 Mindscape, Inc.
The activities and projects included in this resource guide is designed to render the 1998 Grolier Encyclopedia useful as a tool for learning about the research process, as well as a repository of information and resources.

 

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7.1 The student understands traditional historical points of reference in Texas history. The student is expected to:

(A) identify the major eras in Texas history and describe their defining characteristics;
(B) apply absolute and relative chronology through the sequencing of significant individuals, events, and time periods; and
(C) explain the significance of the following dates: 1519, 1718, 1821, 1836, 1845, and 1861.

 

tx_flag4.gif (7192 bytes)  History of the Canadian Flag (Adapt for Texas)

Class discussion of the Texas flag and how it came to look like it does today. The teacher can ask questions and build upon what the students already know. There is a flag making activity where each student creates his/her own personal flag and explains why they chose to make it that way. There will be many illustrations of the various flags that have flown over Texas and the students may display their own flags in the classroom.

 

TN00605A.gif (2512 bytes)  Studying History Through Journal Keeping

A long term lesson in the form of two journal entries. Students will realize that even though times have changed, people behave and act much the same as they always have. The differences are the result of different resources and technology available to each time period. The students will gather information from historical journals and compare them to their own journal entries, as if they were back in time. There is also a video on one family’s journey westward in 1845 that students will view. The ideas for journal entries can be teacher or student oriented.

 

cdrom.jpg (1300 bytes)   Point of View
1990 Scholastic, Inc.
Point of View is a curriculum-based software program that makes U.S. History available to teachers and students in the same way that research libraries and media centers do. It provides excitement and the drama of history as well as important concepts and facts.

 

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7.2 The student understands how individuals,events, and issues prior to the Texas Revolution shaped the history of Texas. The student is expected to: expected to:


(A) compare the cultures of Native Americans in Texas prior to European colonization;
(B) identify important individuals, events, and issues related to European exploration and colonization of Texas, including the establishment of Catholic missions;
(C) identify the contributions of significant individuals including Moses Austin, Stephen F. Austin, and Juan Seguín during the colonization of Texas;
(D) identify the impact of the Mexican federal Constitution of 1824 on events in Texas;
(E) trace the development of events that led to the Texas Revolution, including the Law of April 6, 1830, the Turtle Bayou Resolutions, and the arrest of Stephen F. Austin; and
(F) contrast Spanish and Anglo purposes for and methods of settlement in Texas.

 

 

wpe3.jpg (26785 bytes)  Interviewing of Historical Figures

Students will develop research techniques, writing, listening, and speaking skills. They will research a historical figure, take notes, formulate appropriate questions, work cooperatively in small groups, interview a partner in front of the whole class, and evaluate peers/self.

 

wpe13.gif (4738 bytes)  Famous Person- Who am I?

A review activity to be used at the end of a unit, a grading quarter, or the end of the school year. Each student will have a 3X5 notecard taped to his back with the name of a famous person written on it. The student will not know the name written on their card. Their goal is to try to identify the name on the card by answering yes or no to questions asked by the other students about that person.

 

cdrom.jpg (1300 bytes)   Point of View
1990 Scholastic, Inc.
Point of View is a curriculum-based software program that makes U.S. History available to teachers and students in the same way that research libraries and media centers do. It provides excitement and the drama of history as well as important concepts and facts.

 

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7.3 The student understands how individuals, events, and issues related to the Texas Revolution shaped the history of Texas. The student is expected to:

(A) explain the roles played by significant individuals during the Texas Revolution, including George Childress, Lorenzo de Zavala, James Fannin, Sam Houston, Antonio López de Santa Anna, and William B. Travis; and
(B) explain the issues surrounding significant events of the Texas Revolution, including the battle of Gonzales, the siege of the Alamo, the convention of 1836, Fannin's surrender at Goliad, and the battle of San Jacinto.

 

wpe3.jpg (26785 bytes)    Interviewing of Historical Figures

Students will develop research techniques, writing, listening, and speaking skills. They will research a historical figure, take notes, formulate appropriate questions, work cooperatively in small groups, interview a partner in front of the whole class, and evaluate peers/self.

 

wpe13.gif (4738 bytes)   Famous Person- Who am I?

A review activity to be used at the end of a unit, a grading quarter, or the end of the school year. Each student will have a 3X5 notecard taped to his back with the name of a famous person written on it. The student will not know the name written on their card. Their goal is to try to identify the name on the card by answering yes or no to questions asked by the other students about that person.

 

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7.4 The student understands how individuals, events, and issues shaped the history of the Republic of Texas and early Texas statehood. The student is expected to:

(A) identify individuals, events, and issues during the Republic of Texas and early Texas statehood, including annexation, Sam Houston, Anson Jones, Mirabeau B. Lamar, problems of the Republic of Texas, the Texas Rangers, the Mexican War, and the Treaty of Guadalupe- Hidalgo; and
(B) analyze the causes of and events leading to Texas statehood.

 

 

wpe3.jpg (26785 bytes)   Interviewing of Historical Figures

Students will develop research techniques, writing, listening, and speaking skills. They will research a historical figure, take notes, formulate appropriate questions, work cooperatively in small groups, interview a partner in front of the whole class, and evaluate peers/self.

 

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7.5 The student understands how events and issues shaped the history of Texas during the Civil War and Reconstruction. The student is expected to:

(A) explain reasons for the involvement of Texas in the Civil War; and
(B) analyze the political, economic, and social effects of the Civil War and Reconstruction in Texas.

 

wpe12.gif (3861 bytes)  Role Playing the Civil War

The purpose of this unit is to provide a frame for the students to use in evaluating both points of view in the Civil War. The lesson begins with a skeletal outline of the United States. Portions of the outline are filled as colonies become states. Students will then see how the nation became divided into Union and Confederate territories. Students will then remove seceding states from the board. When the war begins, the country (class) is clearly divided into two camps. No interaction between the two groups takes place once the war begins.
* This lesson can be adapted to the two opposing opinions in Texas at the time of secession.

 

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7.6 The student understands how individuals, events, and issues shaped the history of Texas from Reconstruction through the beginning of the 20th century. The student is expected to:

(A) identify significant individuals, events, and issues from Reconstruction through the beginning of the 20th century, including the factors leading to the expansion of the Texas frontier, the effects of westward expansion on Native Americans, the development of the cattle industry from its Spanish beginnings, the myth and realities of the cowboy way of life, the effects of the growth of railroads,
the buffalo soldiers, James Hogg, Cynthia Parker, and Spindletop; and
(B) explain the political, economic, and social impact of the cattle and oil industries and the development of West Texas resulting from the close of the frontier.

 

 

wpe3.jpg (26785 bytes)   Interviewing of Historical Figures

Students will develop research techniques, writing, listening, and speaking skills. They will research a historical figure, take notes, formulate appropriate questions, work cooperatively in small groups, interview a partner in front of the whole class, and evaluate peers/self.

 

wpe13.gif (4738 bytes)   Famous Person- Who am I?

A review activity to be used at the end of a unit, a grading quarter, or the end of the school year. Each student will have a 3X5 notecard taped to his back with the name of a famous person written on it. The student will not know the name written on their card. Their goal is to try to identify the name on the card by answering yes or no to questions asked by the other students about that person.

 

cdrom.jpg (1300 bytes)   Point of View
1990 Scholastic, Inc.
Point of View is a curriculum-based software program that makes U.S. History available to teachers and students in the same way that research libraries and media centers do. It provides excitement and the drama of history as well as important concepts and facts.

 

Back to Top


7.7 The student understands how individuals, events, and issues shaped the history of Texas during the 20th century. The student is expected to:

(A) define the impact of "boom and bust" and trace the boom-and-bust cycle of leading Texas industries throughout the 20th century, including farming, oil and gas, cotton, cattle ranching, real estate, and banking;
(B) evaluate the Progressive and other reform movements in Texas in the 19th and 20th centuries;
(C) trace the civil rights and equal rights movements of various groups in Texas in the 20th century and identify key leaders in these movements, including James Farmer, Hector P. García, Oveta Culp Hobby, and Lyndon B. Johnson;
(D) analyze the political, economic, and social impact of major wars, including World War I and World War II, on the history of Texas;
(E) trace the emergence of the two-party system in Texas during the second half of the 20th century.

 

 

wpe3.jpg (26785 bytes)  Interviewing of Historical Figures

Students will develop research techniques, writing, listening, and speaking skills. They will research a historical figure, take notes, formulate appropriate questions, work cooperatively in small groups, interview a partner in front of the whole class, and evaluate peers/self.

 

wpe13.gif (4738 bytes)  Famous Person- Who am I?

A review activity to be used at the end of a unit, a grading quarter, or the end of the school year. Each student will have a 3X5 notecard taped to his back with the name of a famous person written on it. The student will not know the name written on their card. Their goal is to try to identify the name on the card by answering yes or no to questions asked by the other students about that person.

 

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7.8 The student uses geographic tools to collect, analyze, and interpret data. The student is expected to:


(A) create thematic maps, graphs, charts, models, and databases representing various aspects of Texas during the 19th and 20th centuries; and
(B) pose and answer questions about geographic distributions and patterns in Texas during the 19th and 20th centuries.

 

 

wpeC.gif (2334 bytes)   Promote a City

This lesson will help students better understand Texas and the variety of places to visit around the state. After reviewing state maps and descriptions of cities, students will write a letter to the Chamber of Commerce of the city that they have decided to promote. The letter will explain that information is desired for a promotional poster. Students will make a poster which includes the city name and students’ descriptions of each picture or pamphlet on the poster.
*This lesson can be adapted to promote a city’s past and present. Students will promote their Texas city from a 1800’s viewpoint and then a 1990’s perspective.

 

tx2.gif (3365 bytes)  Electronic Mapping

An interdisciplinary activity which not only helps students locate places on a map but introduces students to the concepts of scale, electricity, and group interaction. Students will identify countries, oceans, and capitals. Students will draw maps to scale using a grid system, and utilize a computer.
*This lesson can be adapted for Texas studies by locating specific Texas towns and plotting them on a map, or perhaps Texas in relation to other southwestern states.

 

TR00262A.gif (1715 bytes)   Michigan Road Map (Adapt for Texas)

Students will successfully complete the road trip by applying skills on the map. This will give the students a basic knowledge of the border and cities of Texas. The students will be introduced to symbols and skills involved with map usage. The students will be introduced to the problem of being lost. They will be given a map and the road trip worksheet. The worksheet will guide them through the map.

 

tx2.gif (3365 bytes)  Geography Jeopardy Review

Can be used as a geography/history review. Students are divided into four groups but will answer independently. Members can collaborate after an incorrect answer is given by another team. Teams can wager any amount of points on the final Jeopardy question, however incorrect answers result in that question’s value being subtracted from the team’s total points. The team with the most points wins.

 

wpe6.gif (3580 bytes)  Maps and Scales (Adapt for Texas)

Students will use Texas highway maps to determine distance and scale.
They will be asked to explain what scale means, what the scale on their maps represent, and answer a variety of travel-related questions.

 

.cdrom.jpg (1300 bytes)   Texas Geography and Climate
1993, Society of Visual Education, Inc.
Texas Geography and Climate offers a cross-section of colorful visuals from the various regions of Texas, followed by a series of maps and diagram of the state's topography.

 

cdrom.jpg (1300 bytes)     U.S. Atlas and Almanac
1996 Mindscape, Inc.
This multimedia program strengthens the student's ability to find and identify geographical locations on a map. This program also enhances the student's ability to interpret, analyze, and compare maps, graphs, and other statistical information.

 

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7.9 The student understands the location and characteristics of places and regions of Texas. The student is expected to:


(A) locate places and regions of importance in Texas during the 19th and 20th centuries;
(B) compare places and regions of Texas in terms of physical and human characteristics; and
(C) analyze the effects of physical and human factors such as climate, weather, landforms, irrigation, transportation, and communication on major events in Texas.

 

 

wpeC.gif (2334 bytes)   Promote a City

This lesson will help students better understand Texas and the variety of places to visit around the state. After reviewing state maps and descriptions of cities, students will write a letter to the Chamber of Commerce of the city that they have decided to promote. The letter will explain that information is desired for a promotional poster. Students will make a poster which includes the city name and students’ descriptions of each picture or pamphlet on the poster.
*This lesson can be adapted to promote a city’s past and present. Students will promote their Texas city from a 1800’s viewpoint and then a 1990’s perspective.

 

tx2.gif (3365 bytes)  Electronic Mapping

An interdisciplinary activity which not only helps students locate places on a map but introduces students to the concepts of scale, electricity, and group interaction. Students will identify countries, oceans, and capitals. Students will draw maps to scale using a grid system, and utilize a computer.
*This lesson can be adapted for Texas studies by locating specific Texas towns and plotting them on a map, or perhaps Texas in relation to other southwestern states.

 

TR00262A.gif (1715 bytes)  Michigan Road Map (Adapt for Texas)

Students will successfully complete the road trip by applying skills on the map. This will give the students a basic knowledge of the border and cities of Texas. The students will be introduced to symbols and skills involved with map usage. The students will be introduced to the problem of being lost. They will be given a map and the road trip worksheet. The worksheet will guide them through the map.

 

wpe6.gif (3580 bytes)  Geography Jeopardy Review

Can be used as a geography/history review. Students are divided into four groups but will answer independently. Members can collaborate after an incorrect answer is given by another team. Teams can wager any amount of points on the final Jeopardy question, however incorrect answers result in that question’s value being subtracted from the team’s total points. The team with the most points wins.

 

TR00262A.gif (1715 bytes)  Canada’s Major Cities (Adapt for Texas)

After researching Texas’ larger cities, the students will be able to locate each place on a state map and identify at least three characteristics specific to each city.
*This lesson can be adapted by comparing/contrasting characteristics from the past and present.

 

wpe6.gif (3580 bytes)  Maps and Scales (Adapt for Texas)

Students will use Texas highway maps to determine distance and scale.
They will be asked to explain what scale means, what the scale on their maps represent, and answer a variety of travel-related questions.

 

.cdrom.jpg (1300 bytes)   Texas Geography and Climate
1993, Society of Visual Education, Inc.
Texas Geography and Climate offers a cross-section of colorful visuals from the various regions of Texas, followed by a series of maps and diagram of the state's topography.

 

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7.10 The student understands the effects of the interaction between humans and the environment in Texas during the 19th and 20th centuries. The student is expected to:

(A) identify ways in which Texans have adapted to and modified the environment and analyze the
consequences of the modifications; and
(B) explain ways in which geographic factors have affected the political, economic, and social development of Texas.

 

 

wpeC.gif (2334 bytes)   Promote a City

This lesson will help students better understand Texas and the variety of places to visit around the state. After reviewing state maps and descriptions of cities, students will write a letter to the Chamber of Commerce of the city that they have decided to promote. The letter will explain that information is desired for a promotional poster. Students will make a poster which includes the city name and students’ descriptions of each picture or pamphlet on the poster.
*This lesson can be adapted to promote a city’s past and present. Students will promote their Texas city from a 1800’s viewpoint and then a 1990’s perspective.

 

TR00262A.gif (1715 bytes)  Michigan Road Map (Adapt for Texas)

Students will successfully complete the road trip by applying skills on the map. This will give the students a basic knowledge of the border and cities of Texas. The students will be introduced to symbols and skills involved with map usage. The students will be introduced to the problem of being lost. They will be given a map and the road trip worksheet. The worksheet will guide them through the map.

 

wpe6.gif (3580 bytes)   Geography Jeopardy Review

Can be used as a geography/history review. Students are divided into four groups but will answer independently. Members can collaborate after an incorrect answer is given by another team. Teams can wager any amount of points on the final Jeopardy question, however incorrect answers result in that question’s value being subtracted from the team’s total points. The team with the most points wins.

 

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7.11 The student understands the characteristics, distribution, and migration of
population in Texas in the 19th and 20th centuries. The student is expected to:


(A) analyze why immigrant groups came to Texas and where they settled;
(B) analyze how immigration and migration to Texas in the 19th and 20th centuries have influenced Texas;
(C) analyze the effects of the changing population distribution in Texas during the 20th century; and
(D) describe the structure of the population of Texas using demographic concepts such as growth rate and age distribution.

 

 

wpeC.gif (2334 bytes)   Promote a City

This lesson will help students better understand Texas and the variety of places to visit around the state. After reviewing state maps and descriptions of cities, students will write a letter to the Chamber of Commerce of the city that they have decided to promote. The letter will explain that information is desired for a promotional poster. Students will make a poster which includes the city name and students’ descriptions of each picture or pamphlet on the poster.
*This lesson can be adapted to promote a city’s past and present. Students will promote their Texas city from a 1800’s viewpoint and then a 1990’s perspective.

 

TR00262A.gif (1715 bytes)  Michigan Road Map (Adapt for Texas)

Students will successfully complete the road trip by applying skills on the map. This will give the students a basic knowledge of the border and cities of Texas. The students will be introduced to symbols and skills involved with map usage. The students will be introduced to the problem of being lost. They will be given a map and the road trip worksheet. The worksheet will guide them through the map.

 

wpe6.gif (3580 bytes)  Geography Jeopardy Review

Can be used as a geography/history review. Students are divided into four groups but will answer independently. Members can collaborate after an incorrect answer is given by another team. Teams can wager any amount of points on the final Jeopardy question, however incorrect answers result in that question’s value being subtracted from the team’s total points. The team with the most points win.

 

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7.12 The student understands the factors that caused Texas to change from an agrarian to an urban society. The student is expected to:

(A) explain economic factors that led to the urbanization of Texas;
(B) trace the development of major industries that contributed to the urbanization of Texas; and
(C) explain the changes in the types of jobs and occupations that have resulted from the urbanization of Texas.


wpe1.gif (3578 bytes)   Farming Operations

Students will be able to participate in group work and use their critical and creative thinking skills. They will view a video of a farming operation that includes the consumer/producer chain cycle. After viewing the video, the students will participate in a group discussion on the topic. Students will create a bulletin board in the classroom relating to farm products. Students will also create a crossword puzzle by contributing various words related to the farming unit.

 

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7.13 The student understands the interdependence of the Texas economy with the
United States and the world. The student is expected to:


(A) analyze the impact of national and international markets and events on the production of goods and services in Texas;
(B) analyze the impact of economic phenomena within the free enterprise system such as supply and demand, profit, government regulation, and world competition on the economy of Texas; and
(C) analyze the impact of significant industries in Texas such as oil and gas, aerospace, and medical technology on local, national, and international markets.

 

wpe16.gif (4605 bytes)   Triangles Are Not Bad

This lesson integrates geometrical shapes in relation to the various ethnic cultures found in Texas. Students will develop a sense of shared humanity, the difference between fact and conjecture, and the historical causes of civil unrest through role playing.

 

TR00262A.gif (1715 bytes)  Canada’s Major Cities (Adapt for Texas)

After researching Texas’ larger cities, the students will be able to locate each place on a state map and identify at least three characteristics specific to each city.
*This lesson can be adapted by comparing/contrasting characteristics from the past and present.

 

wpe1.gif (3578 bytes)   Farming Operations

Students will be able to participate in group work and use their critical and creative thinking skills. They will view a video of a farming operation that includes the consumer/producer chain cycle. After viewing the video, the students will participate in a group discussion on the topic. Students will create a bulletin board in the classroom relating to farm products. Students will also create a crossword puzzle by contributing various words related to the farming unit.

 

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7.14 The student understands the basic principles reflected in theTexas Constitution. The student is expected to:

(A) identify how the Texas Constitution reflects the principles of limited government, checks
and balances, federalism, separation of powers, popular sovereignty, and individual rights; and
(B) identify the influence of ideas from the U.S. Constitution on the Texas Constitution.

 

Book3.wmf (1382 bytes)   The First Day of Class

This activity will show students that government is a part of our lives and it serves many useful functions. This exercise is an opportunity for students to set up their own government in the classroom. This activity will also give students the chance to input class rules, rewards, and consequences.
*Students will develop their own classroom constitution as based on the Texas model.

 

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7.15 The student understands the structure and functions of government created by the Texas Constitution. The student is expected to:


(A) describe the structure and functions of government at municipal, county, and state levels;
(B) identify major sources of revenue for state and local governments; and
(C) describe the structure and governance of Texas public education.

 

 

Book3.wmf (1382 bytes)   The First Day of Class

This activity will show students that government is a part of our lives and it serves many useful functions. This exercise is an opportunity for students to set up their own government in the classroom. This activity will also give students the chance to input class rules, rewards, and consequences.
*Students will develop their own classroom constitution as based on the Texas model.

 

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7.16 The student understands the rights and responsibilities of Texas citizens. The
student is expected to:


(A) summarize the rights guaranteed in the Texas Bill of Rights; and
(B) identify civic responsibilities of Texas citizens.

 

 tx2.gif (3365 bytes)  The Texas Constitution

This site contains  the Texan Constitution, including the Bill of Rights. Teachers will need to develop lessons using this primary source document.

 

tx2.gif (3365 bytes)   Citizenship And The Constitution

Students will identify government officials and resources on a local, state and national level by reading and discussing current issues and reviewing government textbooks.

 

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7.17 The student understands the importance of the expression of different points of view in a democratic society. The student is expected to:

(A) identify different points of view of political parties and interest groups on important Texas issues;
(B) describe the importance of free speech and press in a democratic society; and
(C) express and defend a point of view on an issue of historical or contemporary interest in Texas.

 

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7.18  The student understands the importance of effective leadership in a democratic society. The student is expected to:

(A) identify the leadership qualities of elected and appointed leaders of Texas, past and present, including Texans who have been President of the United States; and
(B) analyze the contributions of Texas leaders such as Henry B. González, Phil Gramm, Barbara Jordan, and Sam Rayburn.

 

wpeC.gif (2334 bytes)   Promote a City

This lesson will help students better understand Texas and the variety of places to visit around the state. After reviewing state maps and descriptions of cities, students will write a letter to the Chamber of Commerce of the city that they have decided to promote. The letter will explain that information is desired for a promotional poster. Students will make a poster which includes the city name and students’ descriptions of each picture or pamphlet on the poster.
*This lesson can be adapted to promote a city’s past and present. Students will promote their Texas city from a 1800’s viewpoint and then a 1990’s perspective.

 

TR00262A.gif (1715 bytes)  Canada’s Major Cities (Adapt for Texas)

After researching Texas’ larger cities, the students will be able to locate each place on a state map and identify at least three characteristics specific to each city.
*This lesson can be adapted by comparing/contrasting characteristics from the past and present.

 

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7.19 The student understands the concept of diversity within unity in Texas. The student is expected to:

(A) explain how the diversity of Texas is reflected in a variety of cultural activities, celebrations, and performances;
(B) describe how people from selected racial, ethnic, and religious groups attempt to maintain their cultural heritage while adapting to the larger Texas culture; and
(C) identify examples of Spanish influence on place names such as Amarillo and Río Grande and on vocabulary in Texas, including words that originated from the Spanish cattle industry.

 

wpeC.gif (2334 bytes)   Promote a City

This lesson will help students better understand Texas and the variety of places to visit around the state. After reviewing state maps and descriptions of cities, students will write a letter to the Chamber of Commerce of the city that they have decided to promote. The letter will explain that information is desired for a promotional poster. Students will make a poster which includes the city name and students’ descriptions of each picture or pamphlet on the poster.
*This lesson can be adapted to promote a city’s past and present. Students will promote their Texas city from a 1800’s viewpoint and then a 1990’s perspective.

 

wpe16.gif (4605 bytes)   Triangles Are Not Bad

This lesson integrates geometrical shapes in relation to the various ethnic cultures found in Texas. Students will develop a sense of shared humanity, the difference between fact and conjecture, and the historical causes of civil unrest through role playing.

 

kids.gif (13309 bytes)  Multicultural Collage (Adapt for Texas)

The students will use mixed media (newspapers, magazines, and video) to create a collage that represents the diversity of Texas both past and present.

 

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7.20 The student understands the impact of scientific discoveries and technological innovations on the political, economic, and social development of Texas. The student is expected to:

(A) compare types and uses of technology, past and present;
(B) identify Texas leaders in science and technology such as Roy Bedichek, Walter Cunningham, Michael DeBakey, and C.M. "Dad" Joiner;
(C) analyze the effects of scientific discoveries and technological innovations, such as barbed wire, the windmill, and oil, gas, and aerospace industries, on the developments of Texas;
(D) evaluate the effects of scientific discoveries and technological innovations on the use of resources such as fossil fuels, water, and land;
(E) analyze how scientific discoveries and technological innovations have resulted in an interdependence among Texas, the United States, and the world; and
(F) make predictions about economic, social, and environmental consequences that may result from future scientific discoveries and technological innovations.

 

wpeC.gif (2334 bytes)   Promote a City

This lesson will help students better understand Texas and the variety of places to visit around the state. After reviewing state maps and descriptions of cities, students will write a letter to the Chamber of Commerce of the city that they have decided to promote. The letter will explain that information is desired for a promotional poster. Students will make a poster which includes the city name and students’ descriptions of each picture or pamphlet on the poster.
*This lesson can be adapted to promote a city’s past and present. Students will promote their Texas city from a 1800’s viewpoint and then a 1990’s perspective.

 

TR00262A.gif (1715 bytes)  Canada’s Major Cities (Adapt for Texas)

After researching Texas’ larger cities, the students will be able to locate each place on a state map and identify at least three characteristics specific to each city.
*This lesson can be adapted by comparing/contrasting characteristics from the past and present.

 

wpe6.gif (3580 bytes)  Where Have You Been? Where Are You Going? (Adapt for Texas)

The student will be able to identify and describe the scientific discoveries made in different regions of Texas. They will locate those regions and discoveries as well as compare and contrast Texas discoveries from the past and present.

 

wpe3.jpg (26785 bytes)   People Who Have Made a Difference (Adapt for Texas)

The class will develop a list of ways they can or did make a difference. They will develop a matrix of attributes of people who have made a difference in Texas and Texas history.

 

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7.21  The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of sources including electronic technology. The student is expected to:

(A) differentiate between, locate, and use primary and secondary sources such as computer software, databases, media and news services, biographies, interviews, and artifacts to acquire information about Texas;
(B) analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions;
(C) organize and interpret information from outlines, reports, databases, and visuals including graphs, charts, timelines, and maps;
(D) identify points of view from the historical context surrounding an event and the frame of reference that influenced the participants;
(E) support a point of view on a social studies issue or event;
(F) identify bias in written, oral, and visual material;
(G) evaluate the validity of a source based on language, corroboration with other sources, and information about the author; and
(H) use appropriate mathematical skills to interpret social studies information such as maps and graphs.

 


tx_flag4.gif (7192 bytes)  History of the Canadian Flag (Adapt for Texas)

Class discussion of the Texas flag and how it came to look like it does today. The teacher can ask questions and build upon what the students already know. There is a flag making activity where each student creates his/her own personal flag and explains why they chose to make it that way. There will be many illustrations of the various flags that have flown over Texas and the students may display their own flags in the classroom.

 

wpe13.gif (4738 bytes)  Famous Person- Who am I?

A review activity to be used at the end of a unit, a grading quarter, or the end of the school year. Each student will have a 3X5 notecard taped to his back with the name of a famous person written on it. The student will not know the name written on their card. Their goal is to try to identify the name on the card by answering yes or no to questions asked by the other students about that person.

 

wpe12.gif (3861 bytes)  Role Playing the Civil War

The purpose of this unit is to provide a frame for the students to use in evaluating both points of view in the Civil War. The lesson begins with a skeletal outline of the United States. Portions of the outline are filled as colonies become states. Students will then see how the nation became divided into Union and Confederate territories. Students will then remove seceding states from the board. When the war begins, the country (class) is clearly divided into two camps. No interaction between the two groups takes place once the war begins.
* This lesson can be adapted to the two opposing opinions in Texas at the time of secession.

 

na.jpg (41304 bytes)  Native American Thematic Unit

Students use knowledge of the past to construct meaningful understanding of our diverse Texas culture and heritage to inform their civic judgments. This unit promotes cultural awareness, basic world geography, and the significance of historical events on the world today. It includes three-week lesson plans, integration of the five senses, the seven intelligence's, interactive bulletin boards, and unit rubrics.

 

wpeC.gif (2334 bytes)   Promote a City

This lesson will help students better understand Texas and the variety of places to visit around the state. After reviewing state maps and descriptions of cities, students will write a letter to the Chamber of Commerce of the city that they have decided to promote. The letter will explain that information is desired for a promotional poster. Students will make a poster which includes the city name and students’ descriptions of each picture or pamphlet on the poster.
*This lesson can be adapted to promote a city’s past and present. Students will promote their Texas city from a 1800’s viewpoint and then a 1990’s perspective.

 

tx2.gif (3365 bytes)  Electronic Mapping

An interdisciplinary activity which not only helps students locate places on a map but introduces students to the concepts of scale, electricity, and group interaction. Students will identify countries, oceans, and capitals. Students will draw maps to scale using a grid system, and utilize a computer.
*This lesson can be adapted for Texas studies by locating specific Texas towns and plotting them on a map, or perhaps Texas in relation to other southwestern states.

 

TR00262A.gif (1715 bytes)  Michigan Road Map (Adapt for Texas)

Students will successfully complete the road trip by applying skills on the map. This will give the students a basic knowledge of the border and cities of Texas. The students will be introduced to symbols and skills involved with map usage. The students will be introduced to the problem of being lost. They will be given a map and the road trip worksheet. The worksheet will guide them through the map.

 

wpe6.gif (3580 bytes)  Geography Jeopardy Review

Can be used as a geography/history review. Students are divided into four groups but will answer independently. Members can collaborate after an incorrect answer is given by another team. Teams can wager any amount of points on the final Jeopardy question, however incorrect answers result in that question’s value being subtracted from the team’s total points. The team with the most points wins.

 

TR00262A.gif (1715 bytes)  Canada’s Major Cities (Adapt for Texas)

After researching Texas’ larger cities, the students will be able to locate each place on a state map and identify at least three characteristics specific to each city.
*This lesson can be adapted by comparing/contrasting characteristics from the past and present.

 

wpe6.gif (3580 bytes)  Maps and Scales (Adapt for Texas)

Students will use Texas highway maps to determine distance and scale.
They will be asked to explain what scale means, what the scale on their maps represent, and answer a variety of travel-related questions.

 

wpe1.gif (3578 bytes)   Farming Operations

Students will be able to participate in group work and use their critical and creative thinking skills. They will view a video of a farming operation that includes the consumer/producer chain cycle. After viewing the video, the students will participate in a group discussion on the topic. Students will create a bulletin board in the classroom relating to farm products. Students will also create a crossword puzzle by contributing various words related to the farming unit.

 

Book3.wmf (1382 bytes)   The First Day of Class

This activity will show students that government is a part of our lives and it serves many useful functions. This exercise is an opportunity for students to set up their own government in the classroom. This activity will also give students the chance to input class rules, rewards, and consequences.
*Students will develop their own classroom constitution as based on the Texas model.

 

wpe16.gif (4605 bytes)   Triangles Are Not Bad

This lesson integrates geometrical shapes in relation to the various ethnic cultures found in Texas. Students will develop a sense of shared humanity, the difference between fact and conjecture, and the historical causes of civil unrest through role playing.

 

wpe6.gif (3580 bytes)  Where Have You Been? Where Are You Going? (Adapt for Texas)

The student will be able to identify and describe the scientific discoveries made in different regions of Texas. They will locate those regions and discoveries as well as compare and contrast Texas discoveries from the past and present.

 

wpe3.jpg (26785 bytes)  People Who Have Made a Difference (Adapt for Texas)

The class will develop a list of ways they can or did make a difference. They will develop a matrix of attributes of people who have made a difference in Texas and Texas history.

 

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7.22 The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:

(A) use social studies terminology correctly;
(B) use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation;
(C) transfer information from one medium to another, including written to visual and statistical to written or visual, using computer software as appropriate; and
(D) create written, oral, and visual presentations of social studies information.

 

tx_flag4.gif (7192 bytes)  History of the Canadian Flag (Adapt for Texas)

Class discussion of the Texas flag and how it came to look like it does today. The teacher can ask questions and build upon what the students already know. There is a flag making activity where each student creates his/her own personal flag and explains why they chose to make it that way. There will be many illustrations of the various flags that have flown over Texas and the students may display their own flags in the classroom.

 

wpe13.gif (4738 bytes)  Famous Person- Who am I?

A review activity to be used at the end of a unit, a grading quarter, or the end of the school year. Each student will have a 3X5 notecard taped to his back with the name of a famous person written on it. The student will not know the name written on their card. Their goal is to try to identify the name on the card by answering yes or no to questions asked by the other students about that person.

 

wpe12.gif (3861 bytes)  Role Playing the Civil War

The purpose of this unit is to provide a frame for the students to use in evaluating both points of view in the Civil War. The lesson begins with a skeletal outline of the United States. Portions of the outline are filled as colonies become states. Students will then see how the nation became divided into Union and Confederate territories. Students will then remove seceding states from the board. When the war begins, the country (class) is clearly divided into two camps. No interaction between the two groups takes place once the war begins.
* This lesson can be adapted to the two opposing opinions in Texas at the time of secession .

 

na.jpg (41304 bytes)  Native American Thematic Unit

Students use knowledge of the past to construct meaningful understanding of our diverse Texas culture and heritage to inform their civic judgments. This unit promotes cultural awareness, basic world geography, and the significance of historical events on the world today. It includes three-week lesson plans, integration of the five senses, the seven intelligence's, interactive bulletin boards, and unit rubrics.

 


wpeC.gif (2334 bytes)   Promote a City

This lesson will help students better understand Texas and the variety of places to visit around the state. After reviewing state maps and descriptions of cities, students will write a letter to the Chamber of Commerce of the city that they have decided to promote. The letter will explain that information is desired for a promotional poster. Students will make a poster which includes the city name and students’ descriptions of each picture or pamphlet on the poster.
*This lesson can be adapted to promote a city’s past and present. Students will promote their Texas city from a 1800’s viewpoint and then a 1990’s perspective.

 

tx2.gif (3365 bytes)  Electronic Mapping

An interdisciplinary activity which not only helps students locate places on a map but introduces students to the concepts of scale, electricity, and group interaction. Students will identify countries, oceans, and capitals. Students will draw maps to scale using a grid system, and utilize a computer.
*This lesson can be adapted for Texas studies by locating specific Texas towns and plotting them on a map, or perhaps Texas in relation to other southwestern states.

 

TR00262A.gif (1715 bytes)  Michigan Road Map (Adapt for Texas)

Students will successfully complete the road trip by applying skills on the map. This will give the students a basic knowledge of the border and cities of Texas. The students will be introduced to symbols and skills involved with map usage. The students will be introduced to the problem of being lost. They will be given a map and the road trip worksheet. The worksheet will guide them through the map.

 

wpe6.gif (3580 bytes)  Geography Jeopardy Review

Can be used as a geography/history review. Students are divided into four groups but will answer independently. Members can collaborate after an incorrect answer is given by another team. Teams can wager any amount of points on the final Jeopardy question, however incorrect answers result in that question’s value being subtracted from the team’s total points. The team with the most points wins.

 

TR00262A.gif (1715 bytes)  Canada’s Major Cities (Adapt for Texas)

After researching Texas’ larger cities, the students will be able to locate each place on a state map and identify at least three characteristics specific to each city.
*This lesson can be adapted by comparing/contrasting characteristics from the past and present.

 

wpe6.gif (3580 bytes)  Maps and Scales (Adapt for Texas)

Students will use Texas highway maps to determine distance and scale.
They will be asked to explain what scale means, what the scale on their maps represent, and answer a variety of travel-related questions.



wpe1.gif (3578 bytes)   Farming Operations

Students will be able to participate in group work and use their critical and creative thinking skills. They will view a video of a farming operation that includes the consumer/producer chain cycle. After viewing the video, the students will participate in a group discussion on the topic. Students will create a bulletin board in the classroom relating to farm products. Students will also create a crossword puzzle by contributing various words related to the farming unit




Book3.wmf (1382 bytes)   The First Day of Class

This activity will show students that government is a part of our lives and it serves many useful functions. This exercise is an opportunity for students to set up their own government in the classroom. This activity will also give students the chance to input class rules, rewards, and consequences.
*Students will develop their own classroom constitution as based on the Texas model.

 


wpe6.gif (3580 bytes)  Where Have You Been? Where Are You Going? (Adapt for Texas)

The student will be able to identify and describe the scientific discoveries made in different regions of Texas. They will locate those regions and discoveries as well as compare and contrast Texas discoveries from the past and present.

 

wpe3.jpg (26785 bytes)  People Who Have Made a Difference (Adapt for Texas)

The class will develop a list of ways they can or did make a difference. They will develop a matrix of attributes of people who have made a difference in Texas and Texas history.

 

wpe16.gif (4605 bytes)   Triangles Are Not Bad

This lesson integrates geometrical shapes in relation to the various ethnic cultures found in Texas. Students will develop a sense of shared humanity, the difference between fact and conjecture, and the historical causes of civil unrest through role playing.

 

kids.gif (13309 bytes)   Multicultural Collage (Adapt for Texas)

The students will use mixed media (newspapers, magazines, and video) to create a collage that represents the diversity of Texas both past and present.

 

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7.23   The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working
independently and with others, in a variety of settings. The student is expected to:

(A) use a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider
options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution; and
(B) use a decision-making process to identify a situation that requires a decision, gather information, identify options, predict consequences, and take action to implement a decision.

 

tx_flag4.gif (7192 bytes)  History of the Canadian Flag (Adapt for Texas)

Class discussion of the Texas flag and how it came to look like it does today. The teacher can ask questions and build upon what the students already know. There is a flag making activity where each student creates his/her own personal flag and explains why they chose to make it that way. There will be many illustrations of the various flags that have flown over Texas and the students may display their own flags in the classroom.

 

wpe13.gif (4738 bytes)  Famous Person- Who am I?

A review activity to be used at the end of a unit, a grading quarter, or the end of the school year. Each student will have a 3X5 notecard taped to his back with the name of a famous person written on it. The student will not know the name written on their card. Their goal is to try to identify the name on the card by answering yes or no to questions asked by the other students about that person.

 

wpe12.gif (3861 bytes)  Role Playing the Civil War

The purpose of this unit is to provide a frame for the students to use in evaluating both points of view in the Civil War. The lesson begins with a skeletal outline of the United States. Portions of the outline are filled as colonies become states. Students will then see how the nation became divided into Union and Confederate territories. Students will then remove seceding states from the board. When the war begins, the country (class) is clearly divided into two camps. No interaction between the two groups takes place once the war begins.
* This lesson can be adapted to the two opposing opinions in Texas at the time of secession .

 

na.jpg (41304 bytes)  Native American Thematic Unit

Students use knowledge of the past to construct meaningful understanding of our diverse Texas culture and heritage to inform their civic judgments. This unit promotes cultural awareness, basic world geography, and the significance of historical events on the world today. It includes three-week lesson plans, integration of the five senses, the seven intelligence's, interactive bulletin boards, and unit rubrics.

 


wpeC.gif (2334 bytes)   Promote a City

This lesson will help students better understand Texas and the variety of places to visit around the state. After reviewing state maps and descriptions of cities, students will write a letter to the Chamber of Commerce of the city that they have decided to promote. The letter will explain that information is desired for a promotional poster. Students will make a poster which includes the city name and students’ descriptions of each picture or pamphlet on the poster.
*This lesson can be adapted to promote a city’s past and present. Students will promote their Texas city from a 1800’s viewpoint and then a 1990’s perspective.

 

tx2.gif (3365 bytes)  Electronic Mapping

An interdisciplinary activity which not only helps students locate places on a map but introduces students to the concepts of scale, electricity, and group interaction. Students will identify countries, oceans, and capitals. Students will draw maps to scale using a grid system, and utilize a computer.
*This lesson can be adapted for Texas studies by locating specific Texas towns and plotting them on a map, or perhaps Texas in relation to other southwestern states.

 

TR00262A.gif (1715 bytes)  Michigan Road Map (Adapt for Texas)

Students will successfully complete the road trip by applying skills on the map. This will give the students a basic knowledge of the border and cities of Texas. The students will be introduced to symbols and skills involved with map usage. The students will be introduced to the problem of being lost. They will be given a map and the road trip worksheet. The worksheet will guide them through the map.

 

wpe6.gif (3580 bytes)  Geography Jeopardy Review

Can be used as a geography/history review. Students are divided into four groups but will answer independently. Members can collaborate after an incorrect answer is given by another team. Teams can wager any amount of points on the final Jeopardy question, however incorrect answers result in that question’s value being subtracted from the team’s total points. The team with the most points wins.

 

TR00262A.gif (1715 bytes)  Canada’s Major Cities (Adapt for Texas)

After researching Texas’ larger cities, the students will be able to locate each place on a state map and identify at least three characteristics specific to each city.
*This lesson can be adapted by comparing/contrasting characteristics from the past and present.

 

wpe6.gif (3580 bytes)  Maps and Scales (Adapt for Texas)

Students will use Texas highway maps to determine distance and scale.
They will be asked to explain what scale means, what the scale on their maps represent, and answer a variety of travel-related questions.



wpe1.gif (3578 bytes)   Farming Operations

Students will be able to participate in group work and use their critical and creative thinking skills. They will view a video of a farming operation that includes the consumer/producer chain cycle. After viewing the video, the students will participate in a group discussion on the topic. Students will create a bulletin board in the classroom relating to farm products. Students will also create a crossword puzzle by contributing various words related to the farming unit



Book3.wmf (1382 bytes)   The First Day of Class

This activity will show students that government is a part of our lives and it serves many useful functions. This exercise is an opportunity for students to set up their own government in the classroom. This activity will also give students the chance to input class rules, rewards, and consequences.
*Students will develop their own classroom constitution as based on the Texas model.

 


wpe6.gif (3580 bytes)  Where Have You Been? Where Are You Going? (Adapt for Texas)

The student will be able to identify and describe the scientific discoveries made in different regions of Texas. They will locate those regions and discoveries as well as compare and contrast Texas discoveries from the past and present.

 

wpe3.jpg (26785 bytes)  People Who Have Made a Difference (Adapt for Texas)

The class will develop a list of ways they can or did make a difference. They will develop a matrix of attributes of people who have made a difference in Texas and Texas history.

 

wpe16.gif (4605 bytes)   Triangles Are Not Bad

This lesson integrates geometrical shapes in relation to the various ethnic cultures found in Texas. Students will develop a sense of shared humanity, the difference between fact and conjecture, and the historical causes of civil unrest through role playing.

 

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Source: The provisions of this §113.24 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 7684.

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