Grade 4
Social Studies TEKS

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Directions   tex-flag1.gif (26895 bytes)

This document is arranged so that you can have immediate access to the TEKS as they were written by the state of Texas. Each TEKS, including the introduction, will be followed by resources for your use. As you, the teacher, begin to plan for lessons that address the various fourth grade Social Studies TEKS:


        1. Scroll down the document, click on the appropriate TEKS
        2. Review and evaluate the sites and/or software that relate to the designated  TEKS
        3. Plan appropriately.

Some of the WWW sites and instructional software can be used with various TEKS. Therefore, you will encounter the use of these WWW sites and software more than once.

 


Grade 4

Introduction TEKS 4.5 TEKS 4.10 TEKS 4.15 TEKS 4.20
TEKS 4.1 TEKS 4.6 TEKS 4.11 TEKS 4.16 TEKS 4.21
TEKS 4.2 TEKS 4.7 TEKS 4.12 TEKS 4.17 TEKS 4.22
TEKS 4.3 TEKS 4.8 TEKS 4.13 TEKS 4.18 TEKS 4.23
TEKS 4.4 TEKS 4.9 TEKS 4.14 TEKS 4.19 TEKS 4.24

Introduction

    (1)  Grade 4, students examine the history of Texas from the early beginnings to the present within the context of influences of the Western Hemisphere. Historical content focuses on Texas history including the Texas revolution, establishment of the Republic of Texas, and subsequent annexation to the United States. Students discuss important issues, events, and individuals of the 19th and 20th centuries. Students conduct a thorough study of regions in Texas and the Western Hemisphere that result from human activity and from physical features. A focus on the location, distribution, and patterns of economic activities and of settlement in Texas further enhances the concept of regions. Students describe how early Native Americans in Texas and the Western Hemisphere met their basic economic needs and identify economic motivations for European exploration and colonization and reasons for the establishment of Spanish missions. Students explain how Native Americans governed themselves and identify characteristics of Spanish and Mexican colonial governments in Texas. Students recite and explain the meaning of the Pledge to the Texas Flag. Students identify the contributions of people of various racial, ethnic, and religious groups to Texas and describe the impact of science and technology on life in the state. Students use critical-thinking skills to identify cause-and-effect relationships, compare and contrast, and make generalizations and predictions.
    
    (2)  To support the teaching of the essential knowledge and skills, the use of a variety of rich primary and secondary source material such as biographies; novels; speeches and letters; and poetry, songs, and artworks is encouraged. Selections may include a children's biography of Stephen F. Austin. Motivating resources are also available from museums, historical sites, presidential libraries, and local and state preservation societies.
    
    (3)  The eight strands of the essential knowledge and skills for social studies are intended to be integrated for instructional purposes with the history and geography strands establishing a sense of time and a sense of place. Skills listed in the geography and social studies skills strands in subsection (b) of this section should be incorporated into the teaching of all essential knowledge and skills for social studies. A greater depth of understanding of complex content material can be attained when integrated social studies content from the various disciplines and critical- thinking skills are taught together.
    
    (4)  Throughout social studies in Kindergarten-Grade 12, students build a foundation in history; geography; economics; government; citizenship; culture; science, technology, and society; and social studies skills. The content, as appropriate for the grade level or course, enables students to understand the importance of patriotism, function in a free enterprise society, and appreciate the basic democratic values of our state and nation as referenced in the Texas Education Code, §28.002(h).

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4.1 The student understands the similarities and differences of Native-American groups in Texas and the Western Hemisphere before European exploration. The student is expected to:
   
(A)  identify Native-American groups in Texas and the Western Hemisphere before European exploration and describe the regions in which they lived; and
(B)  compare the ways of life of Native-American groups in Texas and the Western Hemisphere before European exploration.

 

 indwomn.gif (35160 bytes)   Texas Indians

Tells about tribes, regions and their different life styles. Has several different names of Indian tribes that you can click for additional information.

 

NWdesign1.gif (3308 bytes)    Indians of Texas

Students are able to view and learn about the various types of Indians and their cultures. The students can view different facts and activities the Indians engaged in throughout their lives and family traditions.

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4.2 The student understands the causes and effects of European exploration and colonization ofTexas and the Western Hemisphere. The student is expected to:
   
(A)  summarize reasons for European exploration and settlement of Texas and the Western Hemisphere;
(B)  identify the accomplishments of significant explorers such as Cabeza de Vaca; Christopher Columbus; Francisco Coronado; and René Robert Cavelier, Sieur de la Salle and explain their impact on the settlement of Texas;
(C)  explain when, where, and why the Spanish established Catholic missions in Texas;
(D)  identify the accomplishments of significant empresarios including Moses Austin, Stephen F. Austin, and Martín de León and explain their impact on the settlement of Texas; and
(E)  identify the impact of Mexico's independence from Spain on the events in Texas.

 

cabazeimage.gif (17424 bytes)  Texas Explorers

The site gives information on the various Texas explorers. Students can click on to the different      explorers to discover specific information.

 

 Alamo.gif (6224 bytes)  Texas Leaders

 Procedure and lesson plan to learn about famous people.

 

cabazeimage.gif (17424 bytes)    Explorers of Texas

This site has all the required information on Texas Explorers for the fourth grade TEKS

 

cdrom.jpg (1300 bytes)   Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego, U.S.A. ?

This piece of software allows students to explore and investigate the United States as they try to find Carmen. The students discover many areas and regions throughout the U.S.

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4.3 The student understands the causes and effects of the Texas Revolution, the Republic ofTexas, and the annexation of Texas to the United States. The student is expected to:
   
(A)  analyze the causes, major events, and effects of the Texas Revolution, including the battles of the Alamo and San Jacinto;
(B)  describe the successes and problems of the Republic of Texas;
(C)  explain the events that led to the annexation of Texas to the United States;
(D)  explain the impact of the Mexican War on Texas; and
(E)  identify leaders important to the founding of Texas as a republic and state, including Sam Houston, Mirabeau Lamar, and Anson Jones.

 

cdrom.jpg (1300 bytes)  U.S. Atlas & Almanac

This piece of software allows students and teachers to explore many different regions of Texas and the United States. U. S. Atlas and Almanac also enables the student to easily locate the state flag, state song, and other important symbols. The students are  able to discover a wide variety of information about various cities throughout the U.S.

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4.4 The student understands the political, economic, and social changes in Texas during the last half of the 19th century. The student is expected to:
   
(A)  describe the impact of the Civil War and Reconstruction on Texas;
(B)  explain the growth and development of the cattle and oil industries;
(C)  identify the impact of railroads on life in Texas, including changes to cities and major industries; and
(D)  describe the effects of political, economic, and social changes on Native Americans in Texas.

 

HRSHOE.ARROW.GIF (2744 bytes)  Role Playing the Civil War     

Lesson plan to help students understand the civil war. They will create bulletin boards with a map showing the colonies as they become states.

 

cdrom.jpg (1300 bytes)  U.S. Atlas & Almanac

This piece of software allows students and teachers to explore many different regions of Texas and the United States. U. S. Atlas and Almanac also enables the student to easily locate the state flag, state song, and other important symbols. The students are  able to discover a wide variety of information about various cities throughout the U.S.

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4.5 The student understands important issues, events, and individuals of the 20th century in Texas. The student is expected to:
   
(A)  identify the impact of various issues and events on life in Texas such as urbanization, increased use of oil and gas, and the growth of aerospace and other technology industries; and
(B)  identify the accomplishments of notable individuals such as Henry Cisneros, Miriam A. Ferguson, Audie Murphy, Cleto Rodríguez, and John Tower.

 

cdrom.jpg (1300 bytes)  U.S. Atlas & Almanac

This piece of software allows students and teachers to explore many different regions of Texas and the United States. U. S. Atlas and Almanac also enables the student to easily locate the state flag, state song, and other important symbols. The students are  able to discover a wide variety of information about various cities throughout the U.S.

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4.6 The student uses geographic tools to collect, analyze, and interpret data. The student is expected to:
   
(A)  apply geographic tools, including grid systems, legends, symbols, scales, and compass roses, to construct and interpret maps; and
(B)  translate geographic data into a variety of formats such as raw data to graphs and maps.

 

 MOVINGCWBOY.GIF (2263 bytes)  Plan a Vacation    

Students map the route and highlights of a trip and explore their state.

 

  adobe.gif (40649 bytes) The Indians of Texas     

The site provides information of the Indians of Texas, the regions they live in, and history of the tribe.

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4.7 The student understands the concept of regions. The student is expected to:
   
(A)  describe a variety of regions in Texas and the Western Hemisphere such as political, population, and economic regions that result from patterns of human activity;
(B)  describe a variety of regions in Texas and the Western Hemisphere such as landform, climate,and vegetation regions that result from physical characteristics; and
(C)  compare the regions of Texas with regions of the United States and other parts of the world.


       

 texas.GIF (2524 bytes) Regional Climates     

Site has a map of Texas divided into regions. The students can enter each region and find out the features, etc. of the regions.

 

cdrom.jpg (1300 bytes) Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego, U.S.A. ?

This piece of software allows students to explore and investigate the United States as they try to find Carmen. The students discover many areas and regions throughout the U.S.

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4.8 The student understands the location and patterns of settlement and the geographic factors that influence where people live. The student is expected to:
   
(A)  identify clusters of settlement in Texas and explain their distribution;
(B)  explain patterns of settlement at different time periods in Texas;
(C)  describe the location of cities in Texas and explain their distribution, past and present; and
(D)  explain the geographic factors that influence patterns of settlement and the distribution of population in Texas, past and present.

 

 adobe.gif (40649 bytes) The Indians of Texas    

The site provides information of the Indians of Texas, the regions they live in, and history of the tribe.

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4.9 The student understands how people adapt to and modify their environment. The student is expected to:
   
(A)  describe ways people have adapted to and modified their environment in Texas, past and present;
(B)  identify reasons why people have adapted to and modified their environment in Texas, past and present, such as the use of natural resources to meet basic needs; and
(C)  analyze the consequences of human modification of the environment in Texas, past and present.

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4.10 The student understands the basic economic patterns of early societies in Texas and the Western Hemisphere. The student is expected to:
   
(A)  explain the economic patterns of various early Native-American groups in Texas and the Western Hemisphere; and
(B)  explain the economic patterns of early European immigrants to Texas and the Western Hemisphere.  

 

 ROTATINGGLOBE.GIF (21560 bytes)  Regional Climates

Lesson plan includes the subject areas of geography, science, social studies, and writing. Students learn to relate and understand maps, and learn about climates.

 

 adobe.gif (40649 bytes) The Indians of Texas

The site provides information of the Indians of Texas, the regions they live in, and history of the tribe.

 

cdrom.jpg (1300 bytes)   Print Shop

This fun and colorful software program has many uses. Students can create banners, cards, and posters using a variety of symbols from the U.S. and Texas. A teacher can create many opportunities for use of this program in the history, social studies, and other content areas. This is a good tool, especially for assessing the creative student.

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 4.11 The student understands the reasons for exploration and colonization. The student is expected to:
   
(A)  identify the economic motivations for European exploration and settlement in Texas and the Western Hemisphere; and
(B)  identify the economic motivations for Anglo-American colonization in Texas.

 


 4.12 The student understands the characteristics and benefits of the free enterprise system in Texas. The student is expected to:
   
(A)  describe the development of the free enterprise system in Texas;
(B)  describe how the free enterprise system works in Texas; and
(C)  give examples of the benefits of the free enterprise system in Texas.
       

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 4.13  The student understands patterns of work and economic activities in Texas. The student is expected to:
   
(A)  explain how people in different regions of Texas earn their living, past and present;
(B)  explain how geographic factors have influenced the location of economic activities in Texas;
(C)  analyze the effects of immigration, migration, and limited resources on the economic development and growth of Texas;
(D)  describe the impact of mass production, specialization, and division of labor on the economic growth of Texas;
(E)  explain how developments in transportation and communication have influenced economic activities in Texas; and
(F)  explain the impact of American ideas about progress and equality of opportunity on the economic development and growth of Texas.

 

 WB01513_.gif (307 bytes) Economics and Literature

This site touches on capital resources, productivity, the law of demand, and quantity of demand.

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4.14 The student understands how Texas, the United States, and other parts of the world are economically interdependent. The student is expected to:
   
(A)  identify ways in which technological changes have resulted in increased interdependence among Texas, the United States, and the world;
(B)  identify oil and gas, agricultural, and technological products of Texas that are purchased to meet needs in the United States and around the world; and
(C)  explain how Texans meet some of their needs through the purchase of products from the United States and the rest of the world.

 

 oildrill.wmf (14422 bytes) Natural Resources

This site incorporates Economics, Geography, and Art to teach the students about the earth’s natural resources.

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 4.15   The student understands how people organized governments in different ways during the early development of Texas. The student is expected to:
   
(A)  compare how selected Native-American groups governed themselves; and
(B)  identify characteristics of Spanish and Mexican colonial governments and their influence on inhabitants of Texas.

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4.16   The student understands important ideas in historic documents of Texas. The student is expected to:
   
(A)  identify the purposes and explain the importance of the Texas Declaration of Independence, the Texas Constitution, and the Treaty of Velasco; and
(B)  identify and explain the basic functions of the three branches of state government.

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4.17 The student understands important customs, symbols, and celebrations ofTexas. The student is expected to:
   
(A)  explain the meaning of selected patriotic symbols and landmarks of Texas, including the six flags over Texas, San José Mission, and the San Jacinto Monument;
(B)  sing or recite Texas, Our Texas;
(C)  recite and explain the meaning of the Pledge to the Texas Flag; and
(D)  describe the origins and significance of state celebrations such as Texas Independence Day and Juneteenth.

 

cdrom.jpg (1300 bytes)  Print Shop

This fun and colorful software program has many uses. Students can create banners, cards, and posters using a variety of symbols from the U.S. and Texas. A teacher can create many opportunities for use of this program in the history, social studies, and other content areas. This is a good tool, especially for assessing the creative student.

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4.18 The student understands the importance of voluntary individual participation in the democratic process. The student is expected to:
   
(A)  explain how individuals can participate voluntarily in civic affairs at state and local levels;
(B)  explain the role of the individual in state and local elections;
(C)  identify the importance of historical figures such as Sam Houston, Barbara Jordan, and Lorenzo de Zavala who modeled active participation in the democratic process; and
(D)  explain how to contact elected and appointed leaders in state and local governments.

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4.19  The student understands the importance of effective leadership in a democratic society. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify leaders in state and local governments, including the governor, selected members of the Texas Legislature, and Texans who have been President of the United States, and their political parties; and
(B)  identify leadership qualities of state and local leaders, past and present.

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4.20  The student understands the contributions of people of various racial, ethnic, and religious groups to Texas. The student is expected to:
   
(A)  identify the similarities and differences within and among selected racial, ethnic, and religious groups in Texas;
(B)  identify customs, celebrations, and traditions of various culture groups in Texas; and
(C)  summarize the contributions of people of various racial, ethnic, and religious groups in the development of Texas.

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4.21 The student understands the impact of science and technology on life in Texas. The student is expected to:
   

(A)  identify famous inventors and scientists such as Gail Borden, Joseph Glidden, and Patillo Higgins and their contributions;
(B)  describe how scientific discoveries and technological innovations have benefited individuals, businesses, and society in Texas; and
(C)  predict how future scientific discoveries and technological innovations might affect life in Texas.

 

 ALEXGRMBELL.GIF (38254 bytes)  Alexander Graham Bell’s Path to the Telephone

This site takes students through the process and steps taken by Alexander Graham Bell in his invention of the telephone.

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4.22  The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of sources including electronic technology. The student is expected to:
   
(A)  differentiate between, locate, and use primary and secondary sources such as computer software; interviews; biographies; oral, print, and visual material; and artifacts to acquire information about the United States and Texas;
(B)  analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions;
(C)  organize and interpret information in outlines, reports, databases, and visuals
(D)  identify different points of view about an issue or topic;
(E)  identify the elements of frame of reference that influenced the participants in an event; and
(F)  use appropriate mathematical skills to interpret social studies information such as maps and graphs.

 

cdrom.jpg (1300 bytes) Print Shop

This fun and colorful software program has many uses. Students can create banners, cards, and posters using a variety of symbols from the U.S. and Texas. A teacher can create many opportunities for use of this program in the history, social studies, and other content areas. This is a good tool, especially for assessing the creative student.

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4.23  The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:
   

(A)  use social studies terminology correctly;
(B)  incorporate main and supporting ideas in verbal and written communication;
(C)  express ideas orally based on research and experiences;
(D)  create written and visual material such as journal entries, reports, graphic organizers, outlines, and bibliographies; and
(E)  use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation.

 

 ROTATINGGLOBE.GIF (21560 bytes)  Regional Climates

Lesson plan includes the subject areas of geography, science, social studies, and writing. Students learn to relate and understand maps, and learn about climates.

 

cdrom.jpg (1300 bytes) Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego, U.S.A. ?

This piece of software allows students to explore and investigate the United States as they try to find Carmen. The students discover many areas and regions throughout the U.S.

Back to Top


 4.24  The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others, in a variety of settings. The student is expected to:
   
(A)  use a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution; and
(B)  use a decision-making process to identify a situation that requires a decision, gather information, identify options, predict consequences, and take action to implement a decision.
         

 ROTATINGGLOBE.GIF (21560 bytes)  Regional Climates

Lesson plan includes the subject areas of geography, science, social studies, and writing. Students learn to relate and understand maps, and learn about climates.

 

cdrom.jpg (1300 bytes) Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego, U.S.A. ?

This piece of software allows students to explore and investigate the United States as they try to find Carmen. The students discover many areas and regions throughout the U.S.

Back to Top


Source: The provisions of this §113.6 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 7684.

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Updated December 2001