Kindergarten

Science TEKS

 

Directions

This document is arranged so that you can have immediate access to the TEKS as they were written by the state of Texas. Each TEKS, including the introduction, will be followed by resources for your use. As you, the teacher, begin to plan for lessons that address the various kindergarten Science TEKS:
        1. Scroll down the document, click on the appropriate TEKS
        2. Review and evaluate the sites and/or software that relate to the designated TEKS
        3. Plan appropriately.

Some of the WWW sites and instructional software can be used with various TEKS. Therefore, you will encounter the use of these WWW sites and software more than once.

 

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Kindergarten

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Introduction

(1)  In Kindergarten, science introduces the use of simple classroom and field investigations to help students develop the skills of asking questions, gathering information, communicating findings, and making informed decisions. Using their own senses and common tools such as a hand lens, students make observations and collect information. Students also use computers and information technology tools to support their investigations.

(2)  As students learn science skills, they identify components of the natural world including rocks, soil, and water. Students observe the seasons and growth as examples of change. In addition, Kindergarten science includes the identification of organisms and objects and their parts. Students learn how to group living organisms and nonliving objects and explore the basic needs of living organisms.

(3)  Science is a way of learning about the natural world. Students should know how science has built a vast body of changing and increasing knowledge described by physical, mathematical, and conceptual models, and also should know that science may not answer all questions.

(4)  A system is a collection of cycles, structures, and processes that interact. Students should understand a whole in terms of its components and how these components relate to each other and to the whole. All systems have basic properties that can be described in terms of space, time, energy, and matter. Change and constancy occur in systems and can be observed and measured as patterns. These patterns help to predict what will happen next and can change over time.

(5)  Investigations are used to learn about the natural world. Students should understand that certain types of questions can be answered by investigations, and that methods, models, and conclusions built from these investigations change as new observations are made. Models of objects and events are tools for understanding the natural world and can show how systems work. They have limitations and based on new discoveries are constantly being modified to more closely reflect the natural world.

  • Science Clips
    Learning resources for the home and school from the BBC.

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K.1 

The student participates in classroom and field investigations following home and school safety procedures. The student is expected to:

(A)  demonstrate safe practices during classroom and field investigations; and

(B)  learn how to use and conserve resources and materials.

  • Sponge Bob Story about Science Lab Safety
    Teacher reads the story and students point out the safety rules broken.

  • Science Safety Handbook
    The Science Safety Handbook for California Public Schools has been prepared to help science teachers, administrators, and other school staff members understand and avoid situations in which accidents might occur in the science laboratories or on field trips and outdoor education experiences.

  • Science Safety Agreement
    Students must know and follow the science safety rules and sing the science safety agreement before participating in any science labs. Parents must read and sign the science safety agreement acknowledging the need for their child to follow the safety rules and procedures as set out by the contract.

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K.2

The student develops abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry in the field and the classroom. The student is expected to:

(A)  ask questions about organisms, objects, and events;

(B)  plan and conduct simple descriptive investigations;

(C)  gather information using simple equipment and tools to extend the senses;

(D)  construct reasonable explanations using information; and

(E)  communicate findings about simple investigations.

  • Particulate Matter: The Lorax
    This experiment will help the students understand how dirty the air really is.

  • The Adventures of Amelia the Pigeon
    This interactive adventure engages children in a story-based scenario that emphasizes concepts of remote sensing and how NASA scientists use satellite imagery to better understand the Earth's environmental changes. It introduces students to Earth science concepts, beginning with classifying objects in satellite images by shape, color and texture, building a foundation for interpreting and understanding remote sensing. The story is set in New York City, chosen for its size, diversity and the visibility of prominent features in satellite imagery. Lesson plans to accompany the adventure are in development.
     

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K.3

The student knows that information and critical thinking are used in making decisions. The student is expected to:

(A)  make decisions using information;

(B)  discuss and justify the merits of decisions; and

(C)  explain a problem in his/her own words and propose a solution.

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K.4

The student uses age-appropriate tools and models to verify that organisms and objects and parts of organisms and objects can be observed, described, and measured. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify and use senses as tools of observation; and

(B)  make observations using tools including hand lenses, balances, cups, bowls, and computers.

  • My Senses Tell Me...
    In this lesson, students learn about their five senses. At this level, you can expect that students are familiar with the fact that their nose smells, their fingers feel, their eyes see, their ears hear, and their tongue tastes. However, students may not have spent much time thinking about how they use these body parts and their senses to learn about the world around them. This lesson encourages students to explore their environment using their senses, first in an open-ended way, and then in a more reflective way. Using student sheets to record their observations, students work in small groups at five "Sense Stations," where they document what they smell, taste, see, etc. Through group discussion, students then are challenged to think about how their senses led them to new information.
     

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K.5

The student knows that organisms, objects, and events have properties and patterns. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe properties of objects and characteristics of organisms;

(B)  observe and identify patterns including seasons, growth, and day and night and predict what happens next; and

(C)  recognize and copy patterns seen in charts and graphs.

  • There is Lady in the Room
    In this activity, students observe and describe the properties of ladybugs and record their observations by constructing patterns and graphs. Students also listen to the story The Grouchy Ladybug and discuss what happens in the story.

  • Changing Places
    In this activity, students observe, describe, and record how ladybugs change their location when the temperature changes.

  • Color, Shape, Size
    Students move objects to follow the related rules.

  • Attribute Trains
    Students figure out the pattern and continue the attribute train.

     

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K.6

The student knows that systems have parts and are composed of organisms and objects. The student is expected to:

(A)  sort organisms and objects into groups according to their parts and describe how the groups are formed;

(B)  record observations about parts of plants including leaves, roots, stems, and flowers;

(C)  record observations about parts of animals including wings, feet, heads, and tails;

(D)  identify parts that, when separated from the whole, may result in the part or the whole not working, such as cars without wheels and plants without roots; and

(E)  manipulate parts of objects such as toys, vehicles, or construction sets that, when put together, can do things they cannot do by themselves.

Animals, Piece by Piece
In this activity, students identify the parts of animals on puzzle pieces, assemble animal puzzles, and name the animals shown on the puzzles. Students also draw and label the animals shown on the puzzles.
 

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K.7

The student knows that many types of change occur. The student is expected to:

(A)  observe, describe, and record changes in size, mass, color, position, quantity, time, temperature, sound, and movement;

(B)  identify that heat causes change, such as ice melting or the Sun warming the air and compare objects according to temperature;

(C)  observe and record weather changes from day to day and over seasons; and

(D)  observe and record stages in the life cycle of organisms in their natural environment.

Changing Places
In this activity, students observe, describe, and record how ladybugs change their location when the temperature changes.

Lucy the Changing Ladybug
In this activity, students observe and describe the stages of development in the life cycle of the ladybug.

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K.8

The student knows the difference between living organisms and nonliving objects. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify a particular organism or object as living or nonliving; and

(B)  group organisms and objects as living or nonliving.

Hey Diddle Diddle
In this activity, students sort living organisms and nonliving objects using the nursery rhyme “Hey Diddle Diddle.”

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K.9

The student knows that living organisms have basic needs. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify basic needs of living organisms;

(B)  give examples of how living organisms depend on each other; and

(C)  identify ways that the Earth can provide resources for life.

Hey Diddle Diddle
In this activity, students sort living organisms and nonliving objects using the nursery rhyme “Hey Diddle Diddle.”

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K.10

The student knows that the natural world includes rocks, soil, and water. The student is expected to:

(A)  observe and describe properties of rocks, soil, and water; and

(B)  give examples of ways that rocks, soil, and water are useful.

  • Rock Hunters
    Students learn to observe rocks of various types and sizes and to record these observations through drawings.

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< Other Grade Levels >

Source: The provisions of this §112.2 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 7647.

Created October, 2006